TestBash Brighton 2017

Testbash brighton adverts 06
March 23rd 2017 - March 24th 2017

TestBash Brighton is back for it's 6th year. And we're pretty excited about it!

This year it is a 2 day event with some additional pre training events.

We will be hosting Rapid Software Testing with Michael Bolton, Lego Automation with Richard Bradshaw and a brand new one day Introduction to Exploratory and Agile Testing w/ the Software Testing Clinic with Mark Winteringham and Dan Ashby.

The first day is a workshop day, with a couple of talks magically sprinkled in.

The second day is a single track conference.

On the Saturday we will be hosting a Open Space event

On both days you can expect a wonderful community to come together in a friendly, professional and safe environment. We think you will feel at home when you arrive!

The venue is The Clarendon Centre.

Event Sponsors:
Pre-Conference Training

Rapid Software Testing - Michael Bolton - 3 Day Course - 20th-22nd March
Michael Bolton

Rapid Software Testing – Course Outline

  • Are you finding it difficult to assess how much time and effort you’re going to need to test effectively?
  • Are you overwhelmed by or uncertain about approaches to test planning, design and execution?
  • Are you working in an environment where some people aren’t following “the rules”?
  • Are you having trouble finding the right balance between planning, documentation, and testing?
  • Are you interested in learning skills and techniques that will help you to become a better tester?
  • Are you finding that “industry best practices” are infeasible and a poor fit for your organization?
  • Would you like to connect—or reconnect—with your passion for learning and discovering problems in order to defend the value of your organization’s products and services?
  • Do you want to get very good at software testing?

Developed by James Bach and Michael Bolton and taught by Michael Bolton, this 3-day, hands-on class introduces you to rapid software testing, a complete testing methodology designed for a world of barely sufficient resources, information, and time. Based on the principles in the book Lessons Learned in Software Testing: a Context-Driven Approach, this class presents an approach to testing that begins with personal skill development and extends to the ultimate mission of software testing: lighting the way of the project by evaluating the product.

The philosophy of rapid testing presented in this class is not like traditional approaches to testing, which ignore the thinking part of testing and instead advocate neverending paperwork. Products have become too complex for that, and testers are too expensive. Rapid testing uses a cyclic approach and heuristic methods to constantly re-optimize testing to fit the needs of your clients. Rapid testing isn’t just testing with a sense of urgency, it’s mission-focused testing that eliminates unnecessary work, assures that everything necessary gets done, and constantly asks what testing can do to speed the project as a whole.

One important tool of rapid testing we will cover is the discipline of exploratory testing– essentially a testing martial art. Exploratory testing combines test design and test execution into one process that finds a lot of problems quickly. If you are an experienced tester, you’ll find out how to articulate those intellectual processes of testing that you already practice intuitively. If you’re a new tester, hands-on testing exercises help you gain critical experience.

If you outsource development or testing…

We have taught this class at outsource firms in India on behalf of their clients so that they can do a better job of testing without needing detailed test procedures. But more importantly, the rapid testing methodology is about getting a lot of value for the testing dollar (value that simply can’t be reproduced by throwing untrained bodies at the problem) so that your top management won’t see testing as a commodity activity that any stranger will do as well as you. Even if you outsource, you may want to have a core team of testers back at headquarters who can rapidly test products to check the “testing” done by outsource firms.

If you are burdened with clerical requirements…

We have taught this class in organizations pursuing the CMM and organizations subject to FDA and other regulatory requirements. Rapid testing is about thinking. As long as they want you to think well and find important problems quickly, this is a class that applies to you. However, we do advocate a lean form of test documentation, to the extent you can possibly lean it. We also teach session-based test management, which allows you to measure and document exploratory testing in a manner compatible with more “formal” process cultures.

Want more detailed course outline?

Michael Bolton has a detailed course outline on his website.

Course Requirements

Please bring a laptop with you. Each computer must have an accessible USB port. Course content and software for the purpose of exercises will be installed on each system. The participants must have sufficient administrative rights to afford complete control over the entire system, including the capacity to install software.

Please direct questions and enquiries to hello@softwaretestingclub.com

Michael Bolton
Michaelbolton

Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn't realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software expertly and credibly in uncertain conditions and under extreme time pressure. Michael has 25 years of experience testing, developing, managing, and writing about software. For the last 18 years, he has led DevelopSense, a Toronto-based testing and development consultancy. Prior to that, he was with Quarterdeck Corporation for eight years, during which he managed the company’s flagship products and directed project and testing teams both in-house and around the world.


Introduction to Exploratory and Agile Testing w/ the Software Testing Clinic - Weds 22nd March
Dan Ashby & Mark Winteringham

Introduction to the Software Testing Clinic

The Software Testing Clinic is a safe environment for junior testers to learn and enhance their testing skills, and for senior testers to learn and enhance their mentoring skills.

The world of software testing can be confusing. There are many conflicting views about what testing is and there are so many different training events around. If you’re new to testing, what do you do? Do you learn how to code and write automation, do you learn about Agile, should you be writing test scripts, and what is exploratory testing? Add into this the time and cost of training and it can all be quite a headache for you!

But knowing your craft is important and we at the Software Testing Clinic believe that for a tester to be the best they can be they should have a place to draw from the wealth of experience and knowledge the software testing community has to offer.

That’s why the Software Testing Clinic offers a safe and open environment for people who are new to testing to come along and ask questions, learn new skills, and get mentoring from experienced testers.

Morning session - Agile testing

Agile is becoming a ubiquitous word in software development and it's important as testers we know what it means to us and how we fit into an Agile team.

In this session, we'll look at what it means to be 'agile' and what that entails when it comes to working as a Tester in an 'agile' team.

Afternoon session - Exploratory testing

It's not new news that working with test cases / scripts can be problematic when it comes to testing. That's why in our next session we are going to spend some time looking at the benefits of Exploratory testing. We'll be running a couple of exercises within this session, one of which will require a laptop or device that can use flash. So don't forget to bring one!

Dan Ashby
Danashby Dan is a SW Tester and he likes Porridge! (and whisky!)
Mark Winteringham
Markwinteringham I am a test manager, testing coach and international speaker, presenting workshops and talks on technical testing techniques. I’ve worked on award winning projects across a wide variety of technology sectors ranging from broadcast, digital, financial and public sector working with various Web, mobile and desktop technologies. I’m an expert in technical testing and test automation and a passionate advocate of risk-based automation and automation in testing practices which I regularly blog about at mwtestconsultancy.co.uk and the co-founder of the Software Testing Clinic. in London, a regular workshop for new and junior testers to receive free mentoring and lessons in software testing. I also have a keen interest in various technologies, developing new apps and Internet of thing devices regularly. You can get in touch with me on twitter: @2bittester

Lego Automation - Weds 22nd March
Richard Bradshaw

Automation is playing an ever increasing role within software development, including testing. Specifically to testing we see the desire to have many automated checks in place, in the ‘DevOps’ space we see more and more deployments being automated. The use of CI is becoming common place. But where will it end, what are the limits of all this automation.

In this interactive experiential workshop we will explore automation using Lego Duplo! We will create a number of ‘automated scripts’, ever increasing in complexity. We will adapt existing scripts for new purposes. All without writing a single line of code. This class is about automation, but we are looking at theory and patterns, not the code. If you can understand where to use automation, how to communicate what’s been automated, and fully understand what you are trying to automate, the coding part becomes a lot easier.

Attendees of this workshop will get an insight into the challenges of automating activities. Gain an understanding of the complexity required to automate something that is so simple for a human being to do. Experience how the initial design of your automation impacts all your future decisions. Observe first hand the limitations of automation. Hear real life experiences from myself and other attendees on their experiences with automation.

This fun, high energy workshop will leave you with a core understanding of where to use automation, how to explain it’s purpose with others and more importantly why you decided to automate something.

Key Takeaways

  • An increased appreciation for the difficult task of automating
  • It isn’t just about the code
  • Acknowledging that automation doesn’t stop once the task is automated
  • How to share your design ideas with others
  • How to talk about automation, with those who may not understand it
  • An appreciation of the effort required to create a good design
  • A simple, yet insightful activity to take back to the office
  • Understanding that the language and frameworks are not the most important thing when designing automation.

If you still need convincing, please read this extended post on the class.
Richard Bradshaw
Richardbradshaw Richard Bradshaw is an experienced tester, consultant and generally a friendly guy. He shares his passion for testing through consulting, training and giving presentation on a variety of topics related to testing. He is a fan of automation that supports testing. With over 10 years testing experience, he has a lot of insights into the world of testing and software development. Richard is a very active member of the testing community, and is currently the FriendlyBoss at The Ministry of Testing. Richard blogs at thefriendlytester.co.uk and tweets as @FriendlyTester. He is also the creator of the YouTube channel, Whiteboard Testing.

Open Space - Saturday 25th March
Richard Bradshaw

Recently at TestBash Manchester we hosted our first open space. We would like to repeat it!

We’re seeing it as an initiative to get people talking more, and perhaps go a bit deeper on some topics. Those topics could be anything, even what what you may have heard at the conference. By deeper we mean many things, such as discussions and debates. Plus more hands on things such as tool demos, coding and some actual testing. It could be anything.

So the TestBash Brighton open space will essentially take the form of an unconference. There will be no schedule. Instead we, and I really do mean we, all attendees, will create the schedule in the morning. Everyone will have the ability to propose a session, in doing so though, you take ownership of facilitating said session. Once everyone has pitched their session ideas, we will bring them all together on a big planner and create our very own conference. Depending on the number of attendees we expect to have 4-5 tracks, so lots of variety.

Open Space is the only process that focuses on expanding time and space for the force of self-organisation to do its thing. Although one can’t predict specific outcomes, it’s always highly productive for whatever issue people want to attend to. Some of the inspiring side effects that are regularly noted are laughter, hard work which feels like play, surprising results and fascinating new questions. - Michael M Pannwitz

It really is a fantastic format, it truly allows you get to answers to the problems you are really facing, whereas with conference talks you are always trying to align the speakers views/ideas to your context, with this format you get to bring your context to the forefront.

Richard Bradshaw
Richardbradshaw Richard Bradshaw is an experienced tester, consultant and generally a friendly guy. He shares his passion for testing through consulting, training and giving presentation on a variety of topics related to testing. He is a fan of automation that supports testing. With over 10 years testing experience, he has a lot of insights into the world of testing and software development. Richard is a very active member of the testing community, and is currently the FriendlyBoss at The Ministry of Testing. Richard blogs at thefriendlytester.co.uk and tweets as @FriendlyTester. He is also the creator of the YouTube channel, Whiteboard Testing.
Workshops - March 23rd 2017
Morning sessions:

Exploring Test Strategy Workshop
Mike Talks

It's day one on a new project, everything is shiny and new - there's even some fashionable new technology you're looking forward to getting to grips with. Then all of a sudden a heavy hand rests on your shoulder asking "so you're our testing expert ... what are you going to test?'.

This workshop will review several techniques at exploring planning testing, such as,

  • Collecting your initial test ideas
  • Looking for gaps
  • Engaging with others to get the best plan
  • When to look for outside expertise
  • Working with and against your test environment

We'll explore this, not just through my experience, but through a series of exercises where we plan out some set projects, and put our techniques under the microscope.

Mike Talks
Miketalks Mike Talks has worked within IT for 20 years, with almost half of that in a dedicated tester role. Over this time he's worked on items such as aircraft avionics systems, online web identity applications and has even tested kiosks. Over that all time he's discovered many unexpected items in the baggage area. With such varied experience, it's obviously one size of testing does not fit all! Mike has worked as a lead reviewer on Lisa Crispins and Janet Gregories More Agile Testing, and is a frequently published author in his own right. He has presented previously at Lets Test Oz in 2014 and Agile NZ 2015.

Mentoring Mastery - Passing On Skills You "Just Do"
Nicola Sedgwick & Shey Crompton

Regardless of whether or not you have any "direct reports" in your organisation you may well find yourself responsible for mentoring other colleagues on testing techniques. The problem is - how do you teach skills that have become second nature for yourself. We're often so busy focusing on improving our testing that we don't develop techniques and soft skills for passing on those learnings to junior testers, non-testing colleagues or new starters.

We want you to leave this workshop with confidence that you can successfully mentor colleagues and a number of techniques to facilitate your mentoring, such as:

  • Where's my motivation: it's not just film star divas that need to find their motivation before acting out a scene. Learning will always be more successful if a mentee is motivated, and to be brutally honest there are some aspects of testing (actually some aspects of any discipline) that are dull and not in any way motivating.
  • Don't feed the mentee: It is all too easy to fall into the trap of providing answers or simply telling a mentee about a topic, unfortunately humans are very bad at retaining that kind of information and we will demonstrate this with a quick game that you can take back to work with you.
  • Imitate, Assimilate & Innovate: Our mentees will go through various stages of learning and our mentoring will need to change tack accordingly. Using role play techniques we will encourage you to frame the subject matter appropriately to maximise learning potential.
  • Role reversal: Encouraging the good grace needed when your mentee succeeds and becomes more knowledgeable than you in a subject area - time to start mentoring them on mentoring.

Nicola Sedgwick
Nicolasedgwick Nicola is one of those testers that 'fell into the role' after working as a Support Engineer and Trainer for a small software house dealing predominantly with the construction sector whose focus is continually on design and quality (no-one wants to construct anything that collapses and causes injury). However, 'fell' implies the role focus was not chosen deliberately, which is incorrect. Having worked in the IT industry for nearly 15 years Nicola feels she can (and should) share some of her experiences to help others, and to help them help their colleagues & teammates.
Shey Crompton
Sheycrompton profilepic

Pre-millennium Shey broke his testing teeth in computer games, he can be held responsible for such iconic successes as Catwoman, Malice and the little known Harry Potter…

Originally from Melbourne Shey’s career has been as varied as his Anglicised Australian vowel sounds.

Following a decade in Games Design, Project Management and Software Development he has spent the past 6 years working back in Test Management - where his passion truly lies.

As a Consultant for the innovative Ten10 he covered various Test roles including a long term placement working with JK Rowling’s Team at Pottermore.

Shey’s broad range of experience enables easy connections to be made with colleagues from all areas of the business spectrum. Shey can regularly be found providing the link or explanation between people from different disciplines.

Shey has a significant presence within the testing community, sharing his perspective on Twitter and the Software Testing Club forum among others. In person he is a regular attendee at London Tester Gathering and of course at TestBash.

While not the first time Shey has spoken at TestBash, this will be the first time speaking for longer than 99 seconds. This year’s appearance follows his 2016 lightning talk on the advice he would give to a new tester most notably "Just do it!".

Alongside good friend and colleague Nicola Sedgwick, this co-led workshop will identify instinctive and reactionary ways of working and break these down into a simple mentoring toolkit.


Story Mapping: Slicing Epics into Testable Bites
David Evans

One of the most common problems agile teams face is taking on Stories that are too large. Large Stories are harder to estimate, more time consuming to develop and test, and require more complex acceptance criteria and tests. The longer a team spends on developing a story before it gets tested, the more opportunities for useful feedback are missed.

Story Mapping is a very useful technique for product design, but it can also be used very effectively to help break down large epics into small, valuable slices that can be developed and tested incrementally.

This practical, hands-on session will give you a solid understanding of what a Story Map is and how it can be used to help slice large stories or “epics” into manageable, testable pieces.

The workshop is primarily aimed at testers, Product Owners and business analysts, but will be beneficial for anyone responsible for creating, accepting and collaborating on the development of Stories.

David Evans
Davidevans David Evans is an experienced agile consultant, coach and trainer with over 25 years of IT experience. A thought-leader in the field of agile quality, he has provided training and consultancy for clients worldwide. An in-demand speaker at events and conferences across Europe, David was voted Best Keynote Speaker at Agile Testing Days 2013. He is co-author of the best-selling books “50 Quick Ideas to Improve your User Stories” and “50 Quick Ideas to improve Your Tests”, was a contributor to the book “More Agile Testing”, and has also had several papers published in international IT journals. He currently lives and works in the UK, where he is a partner in Neuri Consulting LLP.

Talk About Testing by NOT Talking about Testing
Keith Klain & Martin Hynie & Vernon Richards

Why is it so hard to talk about testing?

It feels like such a struggle every time we try to move the conversation beyond metrics, test coverage, tools and checklists… and yet management still does not get what we are doing and walks away shaking their head. The information created by skilled testing should be of immense value… how can it be so hard to describe our work? This can’t be that hard, can it? Surely it must be them… or… can it possibly be that we are the problem?

In this experiential workshop, Keith and Martin will guide us through an exploration of models, tools and methods for examining our relationships including:

  • The SCARF Model
  • Cynefin and Sense-Making
  • Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
  • Context Driven... as it relates to communication

We will look at how we communicate with leaders and decision makers outside the world of testing. Using real world frustrations (that you bring to the workshop), we will discover how the very skills that make you an excellent tester can be leveraged to building linguistic bridges between groups who do not speak the same language.

The talent and value that you bring to your company should be something that you find very easy to sell to anyone who is passionate about achieving the corporate goals. In this workshop, we will discover how to change the conversation away from explaining why testing matters and towards how we are part of building opportunity for success.

Keith Klain
Keith klain Keith Klain is the Executive Director, Head of Software Quality Management for Tekmark Global Solutions, a full service telecoms and technology consultancy provider. For the last 20 years Keith has built software quality management and testing teams for global financial services and IT consulting firms in the US, UK, and Asia Pacific. Keith designed the Software Testing Education Program with the Bronx based non-profit Per Scholas which has graduated 150+ students from diverse backgrounds into jobs in technology. He was the Executive Vice President of the Association for Software Testing and the recipient of the 2013 Software Test Professionals Luminary award.
Martin Hynie
Martinhynie With over fifteen years of specialization in software testing and development, Martin Hynie’€™s attention has gradually focused on emphasizing value through communication, team development, organizational learning, and the significant role that testers can play to help enable these. A self-confessed conference junkie, Martin travels the world incorporating ideas introduced by various sources of inspiration (including Cynefin, context-driven testing, the Satir Model, Pragmatic Marketing, trading zones, agile principles, and progressive movement training) to help teams iteratively learn, to embrace failures as opportunities and to simply enjoy working together.
Vernon Richards
Vernonrichards Vernon has been testing software for 14 years starting with video games on PS2, Xbox & PC. In that time, many changes have occurred in the software development world but testers often still use the trusty old vocabulary of “tests cases”, “pass/fail” & “giving confidence”. Taking advantage of a diverse range of experiences gained on projects such as F1 racing teams, networked gambling machines and others, Vernon helps teams speak in a language the business can understand - no translation necessary!

Agile Exploration Workshop
Alessandra Moreira

Teams practicing any flavor of agile development have different views on the role of a tester. As a test practitioner and hiring manager, I found one of the challenges we face as in the Software Test industry is that although Exploratory Testing makes its way to many resumes and conversations, not many people know what it really is, are unsure how to perform it in an agile context, and are unaware of how to execute it skillfully.

In this hands-on workshop, we will discuss what exploratory testing is by definition and will put it in practice by testing real software. We will examine how it is a perfect fit in an agile environment, and how to master the skills necessary to become an expert exploratory tester - in any team.

Alessandra Moreira
Alessandramoreira

I'm a tester with 16 years experience. I'm highly involved in the software testing community and dedicate my time to causes that have the potential to improve the software testing industry in a global, community or individual level. My passion is for the people side of testing, in teaching how each tester can reach their full potential, in turn raising the bar in the whole industry. I am currently the Vice President of the Association for Software Testing, and an ambassador and mentor for Speak Easy. I enjoy sharing my experience by speaking at conferences.


Thinking and Working Visually for Software Testers
Huib Schoots

Nowadays testers need to be creative in their approach of working. Creating test strategies, test plans, test reports and test cases in the “old school” style is taking too much time out of actual testing and is not particularly collaborative. Systems are getting more and more complex. This tutorial shows testers how to reduce the cost of testing, easily communicate their testing story and involve business analysts, programmers, users and others into their work with visualization. In our daily work as testers we use all kinds of automation tools to support our testing efforts. Among them are many visualization tools. But scientific studies show that sketching with a simple combination of pencil and paper might lead to better results.

Text is boring and not very creative. It lets your brain run at half power, only the left part of the brain is put to work. Visualization also put your right side of the brain to work. People remember images easier. In addition, images often impress us more. We often need many pages of text to describe what a single picture can say. The saying that ”a picture is worth a thousand words” is really true! A single image can transfer a complex idea fast and easy. Visualization allows you to quickly absorb large amounts of information.

By showing hands-on practices participants will learn how mind maps, drawings and graphics can be used directly in their daily work. Mind maps can also be used for a myriad of tasks and processes in testing. They can solve problems, can be used as frameworks, create lightweight test design and deliver dashboard style test results and test status.

Huib Schoots
Huibschoots

Huib Schoots is a tester, consultant and people lover. He shares his passion for testing through coaching, training, and giving presentations on a variety of test subjects. With almost twenty years of experience in IT and software testing, Huib is experienced in different testing roles. Curious and passionate, he is an agile and context-driven tester who attempts to read everything ever published on software testing. A member of TestNet, AST and ISST, black-belt in the Miagi-Do School of software testing and co-author of a book about the future of software testing. Huib maintains a blog on magnifiant.com and tweets as @huibschoots. He works for Improve Quality Services, a provider of consultancy and training in the field of testing. Huib has a huge passion for music and plays trombone in a brass band.


Afternoon sessions:

An Introduction To Testing Internet of Things
Mark Winteringham & Diogo Nunes

When we talk about the ‘Internet of Things’ what does that mean? And more importantly, with the rise in popularity of IoT devices along with numerous high-profile bugs and vulnerabilities being reported around IoT, it’s up to us as testers to adapt and face the challenges IoT offers. So how do we do that, and what do we need to learn? In ‘An introduction to testing Internet of Things’ facilitators Mark Winteringham and Diogo Nunes will share their experience and knowledge of working with IoT and offer attendees a hands-on experience of testing IoT devices. Working as a group, attendees will engage in testing a series of different devices allowing us to discuss the technologies used, heuristics and tools we can leverage in our testing and IoT devices we could create ourselves to assist us in our current projects.
Mark Winteringham
Markwinteringham I am a test manager, testing coach and international speaker, presenting workshops and talks on technical testing techniques. I’ve worked on award winning projects across a wide variety of technology sectors ranging from broadcast, digital, financial and public sector working with various Web, mobile and desktop technologies. I’m an expert in technical testing and test automation and a passionate advocate of risk-based automation and automation in testing practices which I regularly blog about at mwtestconsultancy.co.uk and the co-founder of the Software Testing Clinic. in London, a regular workshop for new and junior testers to receive free mentoring and lessons in software testing. I also have a keen interest in various technologies, developing new apps and Internet of thing devices regularly. You can get in touch with me on twitter: @2bittester
Diogo Nunes
Diogonunes I used to be a software developer but now, I’m a software tester in development (pun intended). I shifted my career a few months ago and I’m getting involved in the testing community. I have several hobbies and every year I start a new pet project. This year I decided to start my first IoT project, using the Internet Button from Particle. It was a huge success in my office and I want to share that experience with the community. I’m an active blogger about technology (and testing). I regularly publish code tutorials, tool reviews, and books’ summaries. Aside from my personal blog, I maintain a website that encourages high school graduates to pursue Computer Science while provides tips for freshmen. To know more about me and my work visit www.diogonunes.com. You can get in touch with me by email (email@diogonunes.com) or twitter (@dialexnunes).

Web And Mobile Security - Attack Like A Black-Hat Hacker
Santhosh Tuppad

This is not yet another hacking presentation ONLY, but fun-filled demonstrations and exercises which will help you to start your security tests from Day 1 after the workshop. Many certified ethical hackers learn hacking in hard-coded way, but it is beyond it as its about mind-set and skill-set which needs to be nurtured in awesome way to grow as great hacker and help the world to move towards safer web & mobile!

The topics that I will be covering include the following (However, not limited to. I will be exploratory in my approach and you will love it for sure. Let’s rock!!).

  • Web & Mobile Security – Break the ice
  • Introduction to Hacking and Cracking
  • Social Engineering Attacks with exercises
  • Understanding the web and mobile philosophies
  • OWASP Top 10 Attacks – Demonstration
  • Web Browser Add-on(s) for Web App Security Testing
  • Mobile Security Attacks Demonstration
  • Let’s Burp using BurpSuite
  • Vulnerability Scanning
  • Vulnerability Reporting & Counter-measures
  • Bug Advocacy Exercises
  • Discussion / Question and Answers
  • Santhosh Tuppad
    Santhosh

    Santhosh Tuppad is a passionate software tester & expert tester who comes from context-driven school of testing and has tremendous experience in web application testing and mobile apps testing through exploratory testing approach. Be it functional testing or security testing, he is a punter. His love for computers started when he was 12 and at 16 he was a hacker. He founded TestInsane to create an ecosystem for people who want to live their dreams in testing doing great work while bringing delightful experience for customers.

    Apart from computers he loves adventure games, Jeeps, Traveling, Driving mean machines and more. And last, but not least he loves to follow his heart very well and is bad-ass at it.


    Coaching Skills To Unlock The Potential Tester In Everyone!
    Toby Sinclair & Amy Phillips

    Do you work in an Agile, or fast-paced team? Are you often the bottleneck for getting releases out? Do you ever wonder if there isn’t a better way of doing things?

    Many testers struggle to find time to do all the testing they want to do. We often hear about people who wish they had more time to spend with Product Managers, designers, users, or other people defining requirements. Maybe you just want more time to improve processes or learn new skills.

    We believe that testers can escape from bug re-checking, and mundane work by enabling the whole team to own testing. Delegating work is the secret to creating time for the interesting, and worthwhile testing.

    In this collaborative workshop we’ll teach you the techniques you need to empower others.

    Learn to coach and to be coached. Learn how to ask questions that encourage team members to be more aware and accountable, rather than always looking to you for answers. Develop your ability to pass skills on to others.

    By asking good questions, and developing coaching skills you’ll be equipped to lead change in your team.

    This practical workshop is aimed at testers who want to improve their testing abilities and their team’s performance.

    Toby Sinclair
    Tobysinclair I’m Toby The Tester however recently I've been branching out into Coaching. I started my career in testing 8 years ago. My testing journey started working for a UK based testing consultancy with a leading retail company. Subsequently I moved to work for a charity who preserve and protect historic places across the UK. Today my journey has led me to the bright lights of London where I help an Organisation transform their working practices. I tweet and blog regularly as TobyTheTester and you’ll recognise me by the cartoon tram from my favourite childhood cartoon, Thomas the Tank engine.
    Amy Phillips
    Amyphillips Amy Phillips is Head of Delivery at Songkick, the biggest independent concert site in the world. She has been testing software for over 10 years at a variety of companies including The Guardian and Yahoo! Starting out she was engulfed by Master Test Plans and Requirements Traceability Matrices, moving to Agile user stories and sprints brought freedom and a love of testing. More recently Amy has been helping teams succeed in a Continuous Deployment environment. Amy is co-facilitator of Weekend Testing Europe.

    Visual Collaborative Test Strategies
    Clem Pickering & Mike Grimwood

    Traditional test strategy documents have little relevance or value in today’s world of agile development projects, if indeed they ever had value (be honest, how often have you read a good one)? But that doesn’t mean strategy itself is wrong, in fact it’s a highly valuable activity; it’s just perhaps the way it was approached could be much better. So out with dusty copy-paste documents that no one ever reads and instead come to a workshop that puts forward a practical and visual alternative.

    This fun, interactive and highly participative workshop introduces this alternative, the creation of a high impact visual strategy poster that is produced collaboratively with the team and can be evolved over the project lifecycle. It aims to strike a balance between the necessity to keep things adaptive and away from templates, but also keep things practical with a useful toolbox for making sense of strategy and presenting it to a wide audience.

    Groups will:

    1. Collaboratively brainstorm strategy ideas against a pre-prepared fictional scenario
    2. Be introduced to new testing models and techniques which can be applied to the context of the scenario
    3. Practice visually representing application of above models/techniques and ideas on their own Test Strategy poster
    4. Adapt their strategies to a series of changes to the original scenario

    Clem Pickering
    Clempickering Clem has been involved with agile software delivery for many years under the guise of many roles, development, testing and DevOps. People, agile and testing have remained key areas of enthusiasm throughout. He now works for an agile consultancy providing coaching, training and sharing ideas whenever possible. At some point he will start a blog but he’s been saying that for years; however see @clem_pickering on Twitter.
    Mike Grimwood
    Mikegrimwood Mike has been working within software testing for the last 11 years in both the UK and Australia specialising in test leadership but also playing many other roles along the way including business analysis and Scrum master. Mike is a people focused tester with a passion for delivering quality products through collaborative working. To follow Mike on Twitter see @grimwoodmichael

    Critical Thinking for Testers, Programmers, and Managers
    Michael Bolton

    Critical thinking is the kind of thinking that specifically looks for problems and mistakes. Regular people don't do a lot of it. However, if you want to be a great tester, you need to be a great critical thinker. The good news is that critical thinking is not just innate intelligence or a talent <— > it's a learnable and improvable skill. Michael Bolton shares the specific techniques and heuristics of critical thinking and presents realistic testing puzzles that help you practice and increase your thinking skills.

    Rapid critical thinking begins with four questions—Huh? Really? And? So?—that kickstart your brain and help you to analyze plans, specifications, risks, causes, effects, bugs, and anything else that puzzles you. Join Michael for this interactive, hands-on session and practice your critical thinking skills.

    Michael Bolton
    Michaelbolton

    Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn't realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software expertly and credibly in uncertain conditions and under extreme time pressure. Michael has 25 years of experience testing, developing, managing, and writing about software. For the last 18 years, he has led DevelopSense, a Toronto-based testing and development consultancy. Prior to that, he was with Quarterdeck Corporation for eight years, during which he managed the company’s flagship products and directed project and testing teams both in-house and around the world.


    Conference - March 24th 2017

    The Tester’s Survival Guide to Joining a Continuous Delivery Project
    Amy Phillips

    As more and more teams switch to using a Continuous Delivery approach to building and releasing software your chances of ending up testing on one increases.

    Joining a Continuous Delivery project can be daunting. People talk about Walking Skeletons and Dark Launches, the pace is fast, and worst of all, the developers don’t even ask permission before releasing!

    This survival guide will set you up for your first day on any Continuous Delivery project. You’ll be equipped to avoid the pitfalls, and spot the opportunities. You’ll know the answers to those dumb questions before you’ve even asked them, and best of all you’ll see how testing is essential for successful Continuous Delivery.

    Amy Phillips
    Amyphillips Amy Phillips is Head of Delivery at Songkick, the biggest independent concert site in the world. She has been testing software for over 10 years at a variety of companies including The Guardian and Yahoo! Starting out she was engulfed by Master Test Plans and Requirements Traceability Matrices, moving to Agile user stories and sprints brought freedom and a love of testing. More recently Amy has been helping teams succeed in a Continuous Deployment environment. Amy is co-facilitator of Weekend Testing Europe.

    Rediscovering Test Strategy
    Mike Talks

    Sometimes it can seem that the strategy for testing is something written in stone, copied and pasted unchanged from one project to the next. A template where you just change a few names and dates, and it's done!

    The last decade has been a game changer for IT - from seeing new frameworks such as agile rise in dominance, to the very way we consume technical and data service radically change with the introduction of handheld devices.

    Suddenly, "what we've always done" has it's own risks, because what we're doing now is nothing like what we've always done! Mike Talks will take you through some of the lures and the traps in test strategy.

    Mike Talks
    Miketalks Mike Talks has worked within IT for 20 years, with almost half of that in a dedicated tester role. Over this time he's worked on items such as aircraft avionics systems, online web identity applications and has even tested kiosks. Over that all time he's discovered many unexpected items in the baggage area. With such varied experience, it's obviously one size of testing does not fit all! Mike has worked as a lead reviewer on Lisa Crispins and Janet Gregories More Agile Testing, and is a frequently published author in his own right. He has presented previously at Lets Test Oz in 2014 and Agile NZ 2015.

    Artificial Intelligence, language and the net
    Professor Harry Collins

    Software testing, broadly conceived, means working out whether a program can act satisfactorily as a ‘social prosthesis’ – a replacement for a human being in society; this takes us straight to ‘intelligence’.

    Hubert Dreyfus famously argued that computers must have bodies to be intelligent. But even if that is true intelligence cannot depend on much of a body because otherwise all physically challenged people would be stupid. I have argued that what computers need to be intelligent is the ability to share in social life and that sharing in social life can be managed through shared language; the term is ‘interactional expertise’. I have argued that we don’t know how to immerse computers in social life/language. One might argue that Google and the like do embed programs in social life by embedding them in the bath of language found on the internet.

    Does this defeat the critique from socialization?

    Professor Harry Collins
    Harrycollins Harry Collins is Professor of Sociology at Cardiff University, School of Social Sciences and Director of KES. He has published about 100 papers and books on: sociology of science relationship of humans and intelligent machines social nature of expertise.

    Step Back to Move Forwards A Software Testing Career Introspective
    Del Dewar

    It’s fair to say that careers in software testing are pretty awesome, however…..

    • What does a typical career in software testing look like?
    • Why is it when organisations recognise us for being skilled software testers, we’re promoted to a role that involves performing less or even no software testing?
    • If we want to progress in our respective careers must we be ready to relinquish the things we get the most joy from, and learn to embrace the administrative, the mundane, the repetitive, the procedural hum-drum of managerial existence?
    • Why do so many businesses assume that if you’re a great software tester, you’ll automatically make a great test manager?
    • If we don’t begin to show evidence of upwards mobility, does that damage our career prospects?
    • Can’t we enjoy a long and rewarding software testing career doing exactly what we love?
    • Why do we accept and invest in cookie cutter career paths, when we could forge our own?

    I’ll be leveraging from two decades of my own experience while considering the case for traditional career advancement and in particular, how that could not only be damaging for you but also for your organisation, both from a reputational and financial aspect.

    Perhaps a new career paradigm is required in order for us to embark on a truly rewarding software testing career, and as the title suggests, perhaps that involves taking a step backwards to move forwards.

    Del Dewar
    Del dewar Del Dewar is a Technical Manager in Test Engineering at Skyscanner in Edinburgh, Scotland, and is a self confessed testaholic. With a test career spanning two decades he has performed almost every test related role in a variety of organisations ranging from small local businesses to large multinational corporations. Like many others, Del had a revelation after partaking in Michael Bolton’s legendary Rapid Software Testing class of 2010 and never looked back. Despite being a seasoned black belt of 20 years in Wado-Ryu karate, Del can mostly be found these days on his road bike and is fully-paid up member of the Club MAMIL (Middle-AgedMen-In-Lycra).

    Kick-Ass Kick-Offs!
    Kevin Harris

    The story kick-off is the most important item in the tester's calendar, but too many testers are happy just to be a silent witness in this meeting. With the introduction of Agile, and the continuing development of the testing role, testers who just sit and take notes in these meetings are no longer doing their job.

    In this talk we'll be going through the reasons why the tester should be the most vocal person in this meeting - what they should be asking and what they should be telling. We'll then see that being more vocal in this meeting will lead to better quality software, fewer bugs, and quicker development.

    Kevin Harris
    Kevin harris

    I've been testing for almost 20 years in a variety of roles and a variety of companies/industries. I've been a Tester, a Senior Tester, a Senior Web Tester, a UAT Team Lead, a Developer, a Senior Test Team Lead, a Scrum Master, a Test Manager and a Release Manager. I've worked in start ups and multi-nationals, and I've worked in travel, government, telecoms, high-street, marketing and medical industries.

    Being in testing so long, I have seen the positive changes to the role that have been brought about by Agile, so am passionate about speaking about these things.

    Outside of work I'm a cinephile and bibliophile, and write comedy in whatever spare time I manage to find.


    Let's Talk About Ethics And Software Testing
    Tobias Geyer

    Testing is a craft which evolves continuously - instead only checking of functional correctness manually testers nowadays also use automation and keep an eye on the so called "-ilities" like usability and accessibility.

    Current trends like IoT, Big Data and autonomous driving bring another area into focus: The ethical examination of the newly developed features. Users are being subjected to ethically questionable algorithms already and they will become more present in the future. Some of those questionable algorithms made it into mass media and harmed the reputation of companies - something which could have been prevented beforehand.

    As with most new areas which testers can work in ethics seems hard to get a grip on. How can ethical implications be tested for? Which guidelines exist already and what to they contain? Does this affect my current software under test or can ethics be ignored?

    Tobias Geyer
    Tobias geyer Tobias Geyer is a tester by profession and bug magnet by nature. He worked in big companies with waterfall processes and small agile teams. He co-founded and ran the “Software Testing User Group Hamburg” until he moved to the other end of Germany. Together with his great team he won the “NRG Global test competition” in 2014 and was a judge in the first Software Testing World Cup.

    Finding Testing Allies
    Melissa Eaden

    From my own work experience, I found that often critical information is scattered across departments. Not just engineering departments, but departments like Customer Service, DevOps, Marketing, and even Sales. What if you actively sought out members of those departments and started a two way communication exchange. Questions could be answered along with clearing up misinformation. Silos would come down and transparency would develop.

    In this talk, I'll share my personal stories about reaching out across different departments and I'll give you ideas on how to reach out between departments on your own. How to develop relationships via games and conversations. How to use the information you gathered to strengthen your testing efforts or even correct misinformation you might have had about the product you are testing. I'll discuss how to push the testing mindset outside of the development organization and foster that mindset in the company at large. We'll look at an organization as a whole asset to testing, customers included!

    Melissa Eaden
    Melissaeaden Melissa Eaden has a decade of working with companies in the tech industry. She began her tech career as an Internal Customer Service agent for Security Benefit in Topeka, Kansas, then relocated to Austin, Texas and continued working in the tech field as a Software Quality Analyst. Melissa’s previous career in radio, television and newspapers, has continued to lend itself to her current career endeavors. She writes about her experiences in life, geekdom, and the tech industry.

    What I Learned About Testing Software By Becoming A Developer, Then A CEO
    David Christiansen

    Testing software saved my professional life. I was miserable in my corporate IT project manager job, so I started testing software on the side and teaching others to test software. Eventually I got a full-time job as a tester at a startup, where I found a ton of happiness testing user stories, preparing releases, and triaging customer bug reports.

    Three years later I took a new job as a software developer, helping entrepreneurs launch new businesses. I launched a new product every six - nine months for three years until my own software business became successful enough to support my family.

    Today I am the CEO of TroopTrack.com, and I find I have learned a lot about testing software since I stopped doing it as a "tester". In this session I will share things I have learned that will help testers have empathy for developers and leaders and function more effectively as a critical member of an agile team.

    David Christiansen
    Daveheadshot I've been involved in software development off and on ever since I was thirteen, when my dad paid me $4/hour to write one of the first desktop applications for prequalifying customers for life insurance policies. I've written software, managed projects, and tested products used for lots of things: building helicopters, finding the perfect gift, applying for public assistance, training executives, printing insurance policies, tracking infectious diseases, managing cellular services, crowdfunding businesses, and more. I am currently the CEO of TroopTrack.com.

    Building Customer Happiness with a Tiny Team
    Paul Campbell

    Small teams have a secret weapon that's more powerful than virtually any tool in building software online: the ability to provide highly personal, personable and memorable customer experience.

    In this presentation, I will talk about the tools and practices we use at Tito to provide an awesome customer experience to over 1000 customers with only a team of 4 people.

    I will talk about the software we use, our approach and philosophy and provide real-life examples of how we have built customer trust with such a small team.

    Attendees will leave hopefully questioning the possibilities of using customer service as a power tool to outperform competition in the early stages of software development and beyond, and learn from actual case studies that have led to delighted Tito customers.

    Paul Campbell
    2015 02 17 at 19.58 Paul is the founder of Tito, a web app for selling tickets online, and the co-organiser of Úll, a conference for the Apple developer community

    How to turn a 403 into a 202 at the API Party
    Gwen Diagram & Ash Winter

    The Challenge

    API design looks easy right? Lots of material, methods and examples to look at. However, we've not been on a team that hasn't struggled to build a clean interface for their consumers. From unconventional use of status codes, difficult to parse responses to endless debates about what to name endpoints. This is coupled with iteratively built API's, which potentially realise value and feedback earlier but may suffer from inconsistency over time.

    What we'll talk about
    We believe that testing can help to overcome some of these challenges through some common patterns, that we've identified through experience:

    • 3 Amigos - being part of the conversation early and often, with the right people, based on not just the implementation but the wider impact on adjacent systems.
    • Test First - creating the right level of tests before implementation together can expose inconsistencies in data and structure. Documentation up front means that the API is usable by other teams before it is even written.
    • Exposing Complexity - designing the tests first can help expose issues with chaining multiple requests which may be a symptom of an overly complex architecture.
    • Scalability - identifying areas that need to be extremely scalable and those that don't by levering domain knowledge.
    How it will help

    By testing first, common errors with API design can be flushed out quicker, even before the code has been written. Design and architecture should not be left to the developers and architects, by following some of these guidelines, as a Tester you will be able to contribute to a consistent, transparent and maintainable API.

    Gwen Diagram
    Gdiagram Gwen started off in IT Support in 2008 and moved over to Testing in 2011. She's experienced the Ops side of when releases go wrong and the Testing side of when issues make their way up to live. She's also dabbled in the dark arts of Scrum Master and gotten far too involved with databases in the past. She’s currently working at Sky as a Tester and enjoys spending most her day trying to make releases a non event.
    Ash Winter
    Ash Ash Winter is a continuously learning tester with a penchant for getting involved in all aspects of developing people, products and organisations. His career spans consultancy, veteran of various engagements encompassing testing, performance engineering and automation, being a team member delivering mobile apps and web services or a leader of teams and change. He also coaches, blogs and speaks at tech meetups, across many disciplines. Quite busy but always has time for a question, usually answered with another question.

    Coach, Explorer and Toolsmith walk into a...
    Richard Bradshaw

    These are probably the three words I use the most when talking to people about what I do on projects. Having spent some time reflecting on my recent career, and observing the testing community, I now feel these are the future roles of testers.

    In this talk I intend to explore these roles with you, using my own experience of wearing each hat, but also a look at trends in the testing job space. We’ll also explore what roles will merge into these, what people can do to fit each hat. We’ll conclude by exploring the current trends in IT and why I feel these roles are the future.

    Do remember though, this is just my prediction, but at the same time, it’s one I've been living for a few years.

    I hope attendees of this talk with leave with the following:
    • An appreciate that things are changing, but also that it’s a good thing. But nothing is lost, it’s all carried, we’ll use it to grow into new roles.
    • Feel inspired to go and explore and learn from other areas outside of testing.
    • Feel motivated to push that little further, extending your current responsibilities in the workplace, energised to make a bigger impact.
    • A realisation that our roles around software testing, exceed far beyond software.
    • Those who are automation focused, discover new avenues to use the vast skills they’ve acquired in that space, but which are hugely under utilised on test/check frameworks.
    • A huge smile on their faces.
    Richard Bradshaw
    Richardbradshaw Richard Bradshaw is an experienced tester, consultant and generally a friendly guy. He shares his passion for testing through consulting, training and giving presentation on a variety of topics related to testing. He is a fan of automation that supports testing. With over 10 years testing experience, he has a lot of insights into the world of testing and software development. Richard is a very active member of the testing community, and is currently the FriendlyBoss at The Ministry of Testing. Richard blogs at thefriendlytester.co.uk and tweets as @FriendlyTester. He is also the creator of the YouTube channel, Whiteboard Testing.
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