TestBash Dublin 2018

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Friday, 18th May 2018

TestBash is returning to the island of Ireland! This time we're going to Dublin, the home of Guinness. We think it’s going to be even more awesome than last time.

We'll be having our single-track conference day consisting of 9 talks and the famously fun 99-second talks with an additional pre-event course thrown in for good measure.

For the pre-event course, we are proud to be hosting 'Exploring Features and Stories: How Testing Helps Teams Build Shared Understanding’ with the brilliant Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin.

On all the days, you can expect a wonderful community to come together in a friendly, professional and safe environment. We think you will feel at home when you arrive!

The venue is the beautiful 17th century Smock Alley Theatre in Dublin, the first custom built theatre in the city.

Event Sponsors:
Workshops
Thursday, 17th May 2018:
Allday Sessions

Exploring Features and Stories: How Testing Helps Teams Build Shared Understanding
Lisa Crispin & Janet Gregory

Do you ever have this experience: Your team discusses a story in the planning meeting, codes and tests it using good practices, delivers it to the customer - who rejects it, because it wasn't what they wanted. We see this all too frequently, even on experienced agile teams. It leads to long cycle times, high rejection rates, wasted time and general frustration.

We don't want to get stuck in "analysis paralysis", but we do need to make sure that everyone on the cross-functional product team shares the same understanding of each feature and story they need to deliver as they begin testing and coding. In this experiential tutorial, you'll learn how to use your testing mindset to elicit examples and business rules from stakeholders, and help turn those into test scenarios that guide development. You'll practice techniques that let your team achieve shared understanding of desired and undesired behaviours for each new product feature, so that your team can deliver value to the business frequently and predictably.

Janet and Lisa will teach practices such as:

  • The art of questioning
  • Business analysis techniques such as the 7 Product Dimensions from Ellen Gottesdiener and Mary Gorman
  • Example mapping from Matt Wynne
  • and more!

Learning takeaways:

  • Ways to explore requirements and do deliberate discovery, in a timely manner, to uncover missing, conflicting, erroneous and unnecessary requirements.
  • Techniques from agile business analysis and agile testing models that help teams scope each feature and deliver acceptable value to the business.
  • How to use your testing mindset to help your whole team build shared understanding for each feature and story, shortening cycle time and reducing rejections.
  • Lisa Crispin
    Lisaernheadshot %281%29

    Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons Agile Testing Essentials video course, and “The Whole Team Approach to Agile Testing” 3-day training course. She co-authored Extreme Testing (2002) with Tip House. She is a contributor to Experiences of Test Automation by Dorothy Graham and Mark Fewster (Addison-Wesley, 2011), Beautiful Testing (O’Reilly, 2009) and other books. Lisa was voted by her peers as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person at Agile Testing Days in 2012. She enjoys helping people find ways to build more quality into their software products, as well as hands-on testing. Please visit www.lisacrispin.com and www.agiletester.ca for more.


    Janet Gregory
    Janetgregory

    Janet Gregory is an agile testing coach and process consultant with DragonFire Inc. She is the co-author with Lisa Crispin of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Addison-Wesley, 2009), and More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (Addison-Wesley 2014). Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond testing the software after it is built. She works with teams to transition to agile development, and teaches agile testing courses worldwide. She contributes articles to publications and enjoys sharing her experiences at conferences and user group meetings around the world. Her peers voted as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person in 2015. For more about Janet’s work and her blog, visit www.janetgregory.ca or www.agiletester.ca.


    Conference
    Friday, 18th May 2018

    Organisational Psychotherapy Taster
    Bob Marshall

    An interactive session allowing participants to experience what it’s like to be an Organisational Psychotherapist, and what it’s like to be a client organisation in therapy.

    Bob Marshall
    Img 20171211 184940 I'm all-in on Humane Business.

    Testers as Test Consultants: How to learn the skills?
    Lisa Crispin & Janet Gregory

    When defining what “modern testing” means to him, Alan Page has said that testers on cross-functional teams should also be testing coaches. Janet and Lisa like to think of testers playing a “test consultant” role. Wait, yet another set of skills we have to learn to be successful testers? Not to worry. The skills that make us valuable testers let us help others on our team learn to be better at testing. Testers are great at asking questions, providing quick feedback, identifying and solving problems.

    Let’s explore ways we can grow and apply the skills we already use, and identify others we might need to learn, to help everyone on our software delivery team get better at preventing bugs and building quality in.

    Learning intentions:

    • Why testers need to be test consultants, rather than do all the testing themselves
    • Skills a tester needs to help others on their cross-functional team learn how to do testing activities themselves
    • Ways we can learn and practice these skills
    Lisa Crispin
    Lisaernheadshot %281%29

    Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons Agile Testing Essentials video course, and “The Whole Team Approach to Agile Testing” 3-day training course. She co-authored Extreme Testing (2002) with Tip House. She is a contributor to Experiences of Test Automation by Dorothy Graham and Mark Fewster (Addison-Wesley, 2011), Beautiful Testing (O’Reilly, 2009) and other books. Lisa was voted by her peers as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person at Agile Testing Days in 2012. She enjoys helping people find ways to build more quality into their software products, as well as hands-on testing. Please visit www.lisacrispin.com and www.agiletester.ca for more.


    Janet Gregory
    Janetgregory

    Janet Gregory is an agile testing coach and process consultant with DragonFire Inc. She is the co-author with Lisa Crispin of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Addison-Wesley, 2009), and More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (Addison-Wesley 2014). Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond testing the software after it is built. She works with teams to transition to agile development, and teaches agile testing courses worldwide. She contributes articles to publications and enjoys sharing her experiences at conferences and user group meetings around the world. Her peers voted as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person in 2015. For more about Janet’s work and her blog, visit www.janetgregory.ca or www.agiletester.ca.


    The Anxious Tester
    Chris Kelly

    Over the last year I have become more aware of my anxiety levels. As this awareness has grown I have noticed that it can really affect my day-to-day work. In this session I want to talk about the things that I do to try and manage my anxiety.

    I've never been diagnosed with anxiety and I have not talked to a professional about it. However, when someone close to me needed help, and eventually accepted that they needed to ask for it, I started to see some of the same behaviours in myself. It took time for me to fully accept that this is normal, even when reassuring that other person. It is easy to give good advice, but much more difficult to act on it.

    Takeaways

    If one person in the audience can recognise a behaviour in themselves that they haven't been aware of before and takes away one of my methods to help deal with it, then the inevitable anxiety that I will feel about standing in front of everyone will be worth it.

    But I would hope that everyone takes away something.

    Chris Kelly

    Take the Blue pill, or the red pill, you decide if you want to change
    Leigh Rathbone

    The challenges facing testers, test managers, test teams is vast, wide, and deep.... it always has been. Recently though something feels different. With all the tools available to a development team, all the 'best practices', the pennies dropping about quality being built in to a coders work from the offset, the shooting fish in a barrel days are long gone, and have been for some time.

    So we all have a choice, and using the Matrix 'Blue pill do nothing, red pill learn and change' comparison, i relay the journey I have been on. 1998 to 2002 I was constantly swallowing the red pill, on the front foot. Then came the 7 year drought, 7 long years of the blue pill. Complacency, arrogance, lack of self development all kicked in, and then ....... BOOOOOOM, 3 events changed my life in 2009 that meant I had to take the red pill, I had to change, I had to adopt a mindset of self learning, self development.

    The message throughout is you own your self development, not your company. You have to make the decision to take the red pill, and change, and I will hope to show the benefits through my own journey of doing that.

    Takeaways:

    • You own your self development, no one else. You will leave with this being drilled into you
    • You need to prepare for the future of testing, and to do that, you have to change from your mindset right now. If your CEO came and asked 'How would you test XYZ', would you know right now?
    • You work in an IT driven world, which is forever changing, so why aren't you training your brain to learn. When you leave you'll know why
    • Think Big, Start Small, Start Now - You will leaving KNOWING you have to change, but I will through relaying my journey, and my mistakes, show you some tips and hints
    • The unforeseen benefits of self development

    Leigh Rathbone
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    I’ve been in testing 20 years, and feel as passionate about testing now, as I did in my first year. I’ve had 9 different testing roles in 9 different industries in that 20 years, from testing the world’s first touchscreen smartphone, to heading up Sony PlayStation European Test Operations, to Head of test for a clinical software firm. I’m currently at Shop Direct working at bedding in agile mind-sets and agile testing ways of working.

    I’m a huge advocate of self-development, and sharing your learnings from that self-development. My own journey has led to me setting up and help run the Liverpool Tester gathering, and following on from that, a lifetime achievement of being the compere at Testbash Manchester October 2017.

    I’m married and have two kids and I’m their personal taxi driver. I’m an Aston Villa fan for my sins, and also enjoy cycling, general geeky things and gadgets. I love watching different presenters and seeing how I can improve and create my very own style of presenting.


    Mistakes Matter - Maximizing the Benefits of Mistakes Made in Testing
    Rosie Hamilton

    Everyone makes mistakes. How we cope with mistakes at work, can have a massive impact on our careers. Generally Testers are the kind of people that pursue self-growth. Learning is important to us and we want to learn from our mistakes. Yet this trait makes us focus on the mistakes that we have made. When we pay more attention to our mistakes. We start beating ourselves up, saying things like;

    "I got the build number wrong", "my actions upset someone on the team" and the big one "I missed that bug".

    Mistakes don't have to be a bad thing if you don't want them to be. I will share some of the ways I have learned to be comfortable when I am wrong. We'll explore some of the surprises that happened as a result of being willing to own up to my mistakes. I will also confess the biggest mistake I ever made in a testing job so we can examine the impact, consequences, and why I will never make that mistake again.

    Takeaways:

    1. How to become comfortable with your own mistakes
    2. Understanding that mistakes don't actually have to be resolved to enable growth and learning
    3. The massive benefits of owning up to mistakes when working in a testing job
    4. How to start cultivating a mistake friendly environment in the workplace

    Rosie Hamilton
    Rosiehamilton Hello I'm Rosie. I've been testing since 2005 and survived 9 years in the UK Games Industry working at places like Xbox Cert, 2K Games & Blizzard Entertainment. In 2014 I left games testing behind and stepped into the world of testing business software. Around this time I started writing a testing blog called Mega Ultra Super Happy Software Testing Fun Time to keep track of all the new things I was learning. I've spoken at and been involved with Newcastle Upon Tyne Agile Testing, Agile North East, South West Test and Leeds Testing Atelier. I am also a host for #TuesdayNightTesting gatherings. My hobbies include violin and yoga.

    How to win with automation and influence people
    Gwen Diagram

    Choosing an automation framework can be hard. When Gwen started at her current role there were nine different test automation frameworks in use for acceptance testing and a lot of the tests had been abandoned and were not running as part of the CI solution. If test automation is not running, what value could it add? The tests that were being run were labeled only as Functional tests and replaced unit tests. These tests covered component, integration and sometimes even end to end testing. Entire layers of testing were missing which made refactoring and receiving quick feedback difficult.

    This is an experience report from when Gwen joined a large organisation and how, with the help of other members of the team created a clear multi team automation solution. By implementing practices such as pairing, cross team code reviews and clear descriptions of what layers of testing covered what the teams came together to write clear, useful automation.

    If you have a team working on multiple products, implementing a framework that can be picked up easily when moving between teams is essential and within this talk, Gwen will explain how to present the ideas to not only members of the team but also, how to get senior management on board with delivering an easy to use, multi-layered framework.

    Takeaways:

    Attendees will understand the different layers of testing - and how to sell that idea to not only within the team but outside to senior management as well.

    They will understand how to solve the problem of frameworks not covering all layers of automation.

    Attendees will find out how to get all members of the team on board to create tests at all layers, not just the testers or the developers.

    Gwen Diagram
    Gwendiagram

    Gwen Diagram is a technology professional from Leeds who specializes in testing. She is an avid automation evangelist with a focus on testing complemented by repeatable build processes with monitoring. She has had varied roles throughout her career including Scrum Master at a Start Up and DevOps kid at a large Financial Services organisation. She is currently a Test Manager at Sky in Leeds focusing on automation throughout the product and helping to make teams within Sky awesome places to work.

    As a strong believer in making the tech industry as open and punk as possible, she co-organizes a twice yearly free day long testing conference called the Leeds Testing Atelier. She speaks regularly at local meet-up groups, Agile Yorkshire and Leeds DevOps, duels with creative types at events like the Tech Off and speaks internationally at conferences such as Nordic Testing Days in Tallinn.

    Outside of work, you will usually find her hanging around a Natural History Museum somewhere in the world marvelling at how incredibly excellent dinosaurs are, feeding pigeons or ducks, drinking the finest of pale ale or trying to figure out a way how she can improve monitoring and logging of her cats.


    Beware The Pickle
    Beren Van Daele & Ard Kramer

    Beware the Pickle (An experience report by Ard Kramer & Beren Van Daele)

    Cucumbers get more pickled than brine gets cucumbered. - Prescott’s Pickle Principle

    What happens when you travel across Europe in search of ‘The Ultimate Test Story? Well… We’ve done just that! 10 workshops across Poland, Romania, France, the UK, The Netherlands, Ireland, Portugal,... Can you imagine the kinds of experiences, learnings and tales we’ve encountered? We can’t either, yet we were there to hear it for ourselves.

    To be fair, we’ve only just recuperated from a period of figuring out what exactly we were part of: A whole year of being baffled by testers that trump each other with unbelievable story after unbelievable story. What exactly can you learn from the guy that sent a few hundred packets of household items to his neighbours,... by mistake? What exactly is there to think about the woman who opened the prisoners’ doors of section D by accident…. every night at 10pm? With this talk, you’ll find out.

    Firstly, we’ve learned that TestSphere is an excellent tool to get people mingling and talking about testing and secondly that testers are a curious and diverse bunch, who are exceptionally hard to define. Yet that’s exactly their strength!

    We’ve listened to your stories, recorded the best ones and tried to find patterns in what makes a tester; a tester. The lessons we drew from all this, we’d love to share with you: Grand stories, peculiar experiences and the great secret of what binds us testers together.

    Every one of our talks will be different as we offer several videos of the top storytellers of our workshop, yet we only show a subset of these during any one talk. Which ones, will be up to you. Our storytellers, from across Europe, will guide us to explain:

    • The impact a tester has on her environment;
    • How the environment impacts the (im)possibilities of a tester;
    • The value of being a tester;
    • How testers differ from each other;

    We offer the attendees insight into the uniqueness of testers, how their biggest power stems from being different, thinking different and acting different. In a world where conformity, repetition and colouring between the lines is worshipped, testers provide the much needed alternative point of view. Dare to be different. Aim to be different and beware the subtle tools of assimilation. Beware The Pickle.

    Take-aways:

    • Help you to identify what is unique to you and how to use that as your strength
    • Hear diverse top stories by real practitioners
    • Gain insight in the diversity that the test community embodies

    Beren Van Daele
    Beren

    I’m a software tester from Belgium who shapes teams and testers to improve on their work and their understanding of testing. An organizer of BREWT: the Belgian Peer conference & a testing meetup in his hometown: Ghent and speaker at multiple European conferences. Together with the Ministry of Testing I created TestSphere, a card game that gets people thinking & talking about testing.

    My dream is to become a test coach for people that nobody believes in anymore or no longer believe in themselves. People that have motivation and will, but no luck. I want to tap into that potential and give them the opportunity to become kick-ass testers.


    Ard Kramer
    Bvof alten 2017 ard kramer 1

    I am a software tester from the Netherlands and I am working for Alten Nederland since 2008. I call myself a Qualisopher which stands for someone “who loves truth and wisdom and at the same time is decisive to improve man and his environment” . This means I am interested in the world around us, to see what I can learn and I can apply in software testing. That is one of the reason why I tell stories in books and at (test) conferences such as EuroSTAR, Expo:QA, Belgium Testing Days, CAST and Testnet conferences. My dream is to participate, as a good qualisopher, in all kind of projects such as sports, culture or software testing. Projects which add value to our community: I want to inspire other people by cooperation, fun and empathy and hopefully bring light in someone's life.


    How to make your test environment work for you
    Erol Selitektay

    Over the years, I’ve learned one key lesson from my experience in automating test cases. Regardless of how much effort I put into making my test suites the most well-designed, high-quality work of software engineering, the fact remains that all these test cases are useless if I don’t have a test infrastructure to adequately support running them. In my experience test environment availability is very limited and I need to be able to work with minimal resources.

    For example, on a recent project I was responsible for, I had a suite of REST API tests, which needed to be run continuously in a collection of environments that mirrored a variety of customer environment configurations (OS, database server, application server, browser).

    I could have gone the traditional route of having a permanent environment in place for each environment configuration but this would have been very draining on the limited resources available to me. Also, in my case, my test suite was made up of API tests, which meant they executed relatively quickly (compared to say UI tests). To have multiple environments dedicated to running a short test cycle a few times a day seemed to me like a massive waste of resources.

    To solve this problem, I looked into using Docker containers. This way I could configure, create and remove environments easily, quickly so as best to suit our own environmental requirements.

    So in this talk, I would like to take the audience through my journey of how I used Docker and CI tools to overcome the challenges I had around lack of test infrastructure resources.

    My talk will cover the following:

    • How to create docker containers automatically when needed
    • How to remove docker containers automatically when not needed anymore
    • Several ways to create and remove docker containers
    • Advantage of using Docker to create test environment
    • Challenges involved with creating a test environment

    Erol Selitektay
    Erol selitektay

    Erol is a QA Engineer with 7+ years of experience. He's currently working as a Senior QA Engineer at Guidewire. He is passionate about learning and exploring new test automation technologies. He likes every aspect of automation and has experience in web testing, mobile testing, API testing and performance testing. Also, he enjoys using open source tools and technologies. He likes travel and attending tech meetups and conferences.


    From tester to test coach, a voyage into the unknown
    Rob Meaney

    I believe that the evolving role of a tester is to advocate for and encourage the right testing to be done rather than performing the testing activity.

    As a result of this belief I have embarked on a journey, from being a dedicated tester on a scrum team to a test coach advocating for quality and influencing test practices across an entire organisation.

    In this session i'll discuss the emotions, obstacles, successes and learning that I experienced during my journey so far. I'll also talk through the results of my efforts and provide advice for anyone looking to follow me on this journey.

    Takeaways:

    Attendees to this session will get an insight into the many challenges of taking on a test coaching role but also the potential rewards.

    I hope the session will also provide helpful advice to anyone hoping to advocate for and encourage the right testing within their organisation.

    The attendees will hear my story, the pitfalls I experienced, the things that worked and what I learned and I believe will come out with a better understanding of how to influence those around them to focus on delivering a quality product.

    Rob Meaney
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    I'm Rob Meaney, I've a degree in electrical & electronic engineering. I came to work in the software industry soon after finishing college and began working as a tester without even knowing what stating was.

    I learned my trade testing desktop applications for manufacturing safety automation industry. Soon I got bored of manually checking the same thing over and over to I decided to try automating some of my tests.

    Since then I have worked in the start-ups, gaming, data storage, medical, fraud detection and communication companies building test and automation frameworks.

    I've worked as a manual tester, automation architect and test manager.

    I love testing and continuously read and learn about testing and development

    From a personal perspective, I love to work hard and have fun doing it. I'm always up for a bit of messing but I take my job very seriously.


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